Joie de vivre.

The night walked down the sky with the moon in her hand.

socialismartnature:

On July 8, 1898 the final signature was attached to the Newlands Resolution annexing Hawaii to the U.S. This despite the fact that the opposition was made clear in the “Petitions Against Annexation” signed by more than half the Hawaiian population (http://1.usa.gov/12DDOR). Who was in favor of annexation? Just look at who was named Governor of the newly annexed islands by Pres. McKinley: Sanford Dole [yes, that Dole, the fruit magnate]. Learn more about the history of Hawaii: http://bit.ly/xEBuOa

socialismartnature:

On July 8, 1898 the final signature was attached to the Newlands Resolution annexing Hawaii to the U.S. This despite the fact that the opposition was made clear in the “Petitions Against Annexation” signed by more than half the Hawaiian population (http://1.usa.gov/12DDOR). Who was in favor of annexation? Just look at who was named Governor of the newly annexed islands by Pres. McKinley: Sanford Dole [yes, that Dole, the fruit magnate]. Learn more about the history of Hawaii: http://bit.ly/xEBuOa

(via wifwolf)

sicrowe:

Rinko Kikuchi, photo by Ryan Hooks for Anthem Magazine

sicrowe:

Rinko Kikuchi, photo by Ryan Hooks for Anthem Magazine

(via paisaprivilege)

colorfulcuties:

♥
findfuckforget:

Williamsburg

findfuckforget:

Williamsburg

(via youremindmeofyou)

vdeguadalupe:

Cervantes, Melanie. Tonantzin. 2011.

Tonantzin is a representation of mother earth or mother of corn as embodied by indigenous women in the Americas. This portrait is of a Tarahumara woman.  I include the serpent symbology because prior to a Judeo-Christian tradition which views serpents as evil, indigenous matriarchal worldviews associate serpents with spiritual wisdom, femininity and being grounded. This piece honors the spiritual and ethereal grandmothers who connect me to every relation living and in the spiritual realm.

vdeguadalupe:

Cervantes, Melanie. Tonantzin. 2011.

Tonantzin is a representation of mother earth or mother of corn as embodied by indigenous women in the Americas. This portrait is of a Tarahumara woman.  I include the serpent symbology because prior to a Judeo-Christian tradition which views serpents as evil, indigenous matriarchal worldviews associate serpents with spiritual wisdom, femininity and being grounded. This piece honors the spiritual and ethereal grandmothers who connect me to every relation living and in the spiritual realm.

(via m-e-s-t-i-z-a)

saindoux:

Alek Wek photographed by Raymond Meier for Harpers Bazaar, November 1998

saindoux:

Alek Wek photographed by Raymond Meier for Harpers Bazaar, November 1998

(via neuronstarcollision)